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Spring Break Art Class for Children Impacted by Hurricane Harvey

Updated: Jan 10


City ArtWorks and Education Unbound Partner to Offer Free Spring Break Art Classes to Low Income Children Recovering from Hurricane Harvey


HOUSTON, TX–Feb. 10, 2018–City ArtWorks and Education Unbound partner to offer free Spring Break art classes to 30 children from low-income families who are recovering from Hurricane Harvey. Art classes help develop skills beneficial in school, work, and life. Spring Break art classes take place at the City ArtWorks Studio. Spring Break classes start Monday, March 12 and end Friday, March 16. Classes occur 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.


Click here to learn more about City ArtWorks Spring Break art classes.

Children from families directly impacted by Hurricane Harvey may join a special class “Wild Weather – Majestic Skies”. Trained and experienced teachers provide art curriculum and lessons focused on weather. Children have the opportunity to express their feelings about the changing weather through art. The art camp gives children a safe place to explore their thoughts and reactions to the storm that had such a significant impact on their lives.


Children who show proof of free lunch certificates and whose homes flooded are welcome at no charge. Register online at www.cityartworks.org. City ArtWorks embraces the opportunity for collaboration with other organizations in Houston. If you are interested in exploring a partnership with City Artworks please contact us.


Education Unbound (McKinney, TX), is a nonprofit organization (www.educationunbound.org). Its mission is to nurture the potential of great minds by providing STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, Mathematics) programming to underprivileged and under-served populations in our communities.


Founded in 1982, City ArtWorks (www.cityartworks.org) is a non-profit organization devoted to developing the potential of children through art classes and art education. This year City ArtWorks will serve more than 1,500 children in over 50 public and private schools, low income apartments and community centers across the Greater Houston area.


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